Financial Business

Only as a last resort should one touch their retirement savings
for anything other than retirement expenses. But, in those cases
when you need to tap into your retirement savings, a way to get money
out of your retirement account without paying the penalty and deferring
the tax was just made available beginning in 2002, as a result
of a tax law change.

Under the new law, those with a small business and no employees
or only a spouse as an employee can establish Solo-Owner 401(k) plans
and take a loan from those plans. The loan from the Solo-Owner 401(k)
is not treated as a withdrawal. As such it is not subject to tax
and the 10% penalty for early withdrawal as long as you repay the loan
on time.

You can roll over or transfer the funds you have in your IRAs, 401(k),
403(b), or other qualified retirement funds into your Solo-Owner 401(k)
and then borrow from the balance in your Solo-Owner 401(k) plan.

Employees of large corporations for the most part always had
the ability to borrow from their 401(k). Now small business owners,
such as freelancers, consultants, and entrepreneurs, who have left
the corporate world also have that choice. They can borrow up to the
lesser of $50,000 or 50% of the balance in their 401(k).
A Solo-Owner 401(k) plan gives small business owners the opportunity
to defer up to $40,000 per year in a tax deferred retirement plan
and the flexibility, should they ever need itPsychology Articles, to borrow from their
retirement funds.

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